(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1925-1926"

1925-26 




2^illlJ[iliiiliiillllllllllilllllilllllllllilllllllllllillilllllllNilllllilliuittilllllliiiiit 

I riiorEKTY or I 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE, 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 



School Address 



= Home Address 



uiuirttiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iniiiiiiiin 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/maryvillehand192526youn 



nilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllJIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllMMilllilEMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



VOLUME XXI 
1925-26 



EDITOR 
ROBERT S. HARVEY 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

HILDA HARRIS 
BUSINES MANAGER 
WM. B. JONES, JR. 



I Published By = 

r The Young Men's and Young | 

= Women's Christian = 

= Associations i 

i Of Maryville College I 

I MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE | 

iiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMitiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 



INDEX 

Page 

Activities of the Y. W. C. A 25 

Advertisements 52 

Alpha Sigma Literary Society ... 31 

Alumni Welcomes You 5 

A^thenian Literary Society 33 

A^thletics, Intercollegiate 42 

.^.thletics, Y. M. C. A 21 

Bainonian Literary Society .... 32 

Baseball 44 

Basketball 44 

"Big Sisters" of Y. W. C. A 26 

Blue Ridge 18 

Chemistry Club 39 

Chilhowean 40 

College Band 38 

College Calendar, 1925-1926 .....6-7 

Church Directory 51 

Debate and Oratory 35 

Dramatic Club 37 

Football 42 

Football Schedule, 1925 43 

Fred Hope Fund 20 

Friendship Council of Y. M. C. A. 17 

Guides for New Students 9 

Handbook 41 

Highland Echo 40 

Hikes 23 

Hi-Trail Club 38 

Introduction 4 

Law Club 38 

Life Work Conference 19 

2 



INDEX— Continued 

Page 

Mail Service 10 

Membership in Y, M. C. A 16 

Men's Glee Club 36 

M. C. Track Records 46 

Ministerial Association 36 

Nu Gamma Sigma 26 

Officers of Y. M. C. A 15 

Open Forum 30 

Pre-Medical Club 39 

President's Message 8 

Reading Room of Y. W. C. A 28 

Religious Meetings of the College 24 

Schedule of Classes 48-50 

Social Events 28 

State Clubs 39 

Student Council 31 

Student Volunteer Group 37 

Sunday Afternoon Meetings of 

the Y. W. C. A 29 

Sunday Meetings of the Y. M. C. A. 17 

Tennis 45 

Theta Epsilon Literary Society.. 34 

To the New Men 12-14 

Track 45 

Who's Who in Maryville 11 

"Y" Bee 41 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 16 

Y. M. C. A. Inter-Class Track 

Meet Record 22 



INTRODUCTION 



The Young- Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and the Young "Women's 
Christian Association of Maryville 
College offer to you who are coming 
to M. C. for the first time, this 
Handbook as a guide and counsellor 
for you while in Maryville. 

This little book is supplementary 
to the catalogue and presents 
briefly the various phases and ac- 
tivities of our college life at Mary- 
ville. This information is given to 
you who are new so that you may 
more easily fit into the college life. 

These four years spent at Mary- 
ville will be busy years and they 
will pass quickly. Our advice then 
is to strive for the best in those 
brief years. We trust that through 
your association with fellow stu- 
dents here you will get the "Mary- 
ville Spirit" which means a bigger, 
better manhood and womanhood. 
That you may be aided in getting 
these things we offer you the infor- 
mation contained in this book and 
with it extend our best wishes for 
a successful course at Maryville. 
EDITORS. 



ALUMNI WELCOME YOU 



The Alumni Association is glad to 
convey, throug-h the Handbook, a 
message of greeting to Maryville 
students. Alumni hope the year 
1925-1926 will be the best in the his- 
tory of the College. They could be 
expected to hope for a good year 
even for their own sakes, because 
every successful year reflects cred- 
it upon each person who holds a de- 
gree from the institution. But 
chiefly they hope for a successful 
year because they love the old 
school and are convinced that it has 
a vital service to render its students 
in the way of character and happi- 
ness. 

Alumni hope for a good year for 
the College, and that means a good 
year for the students because they 
are the College. Except for the 
students there is no reason for its 
existence. Therefore every student 
may feel sure the Alumni wish him 
"the best of luck" for the year. 
And in this spirit we commend to 
all the Christian Associations and 
other organizations of the Hill. 

They are anxious to make it a good 
year, and have shown an example 
of their willingness to help by plac- 
ing this useful and attractive little 
book in your hands. 
Maryville College Alumni Associa- 
tion, 

H. E. ORR, Secretary. 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 

1925-26 

1925 — 

Sept. 8, Tuesday, 8:00 a. ni.-4:00 p. 
m. — Registration for the first se- 
mester. 

Sept. 8, 9, Tuesday, Wednesday — 
Entrance Examinations. 

Sept. 9, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — 
Opening chapel service. 

Sept. 9, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.-3:00 
p. m. — Organization of classes. 

Sept. 12, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Fac- 
ulty reception. 

Sept. 12, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W, C. A. receptions. 

Nov. 26, Thursday — Thanksgiving 
Day. 

Dec. 21, Monday — Classes moved 
forword one day. 

Dec. 22, Tuesday, 3:00 p. m. — Christ- 
mas holidays begin. 

1926 — 

Jan. 6, Wednesday, 8:10 a. m. — Class 
work resumed. 

Jan. 16, Saturday — First semester 
examinations begin. 

Jan. 23, Saturday — First semester 
examinations end. 

Jan. 23, Saturday — First semester 
ends. 

Jan. 26, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m, — Second 
semester begins. 

Feb. 2, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Feb- 
ruary Meetings begin. 

Feb. 3, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — 
Meeting of the Directors. 

May 26. Wednesday — Second semes- 
ter examina,tions begin. 

May 28, Friday, 8:00 p. m. — Grad- 
uation exercises of the Expres- 
sion Department. 



May 29, Saturday 3:00 p. m. — An- 
nual exhibit of the Art Depart- 
ment. 

May 29, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Grad- 
uation exercises of the Music De- 
partment. 

May 30, Sabbath, 10:30 a. m. — Bac- 
calaureate Sermon. 

May 30, Sabbath, 6:30 p. m. — Annual 
address to the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. V/. C. A. 

May 31, Monday, 8:00 p. m. — Bates 
Prize Oratorical Contest. 

June 1, Tuesday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual 
exhibit of the Home Economics 
Department. 

June 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p. m. — Senior 
Class Play. 

June 2. Wednesday — Second semes- 
ter examinations end. 

June 2, Wednesday — Senior Class 
Day exercises. 

June 2, Wednesday, 7:30 p. m. — An- 
nual meeting- and banquet of the 
Alumni Association. 

June 3, Thursday, 8:30 a. m. — Meet- 
ing of the Directors. 

June 3, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Com- 
mencement. 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S 
FOREWORD 



The Maryville College Y. M. C. A., 
organized in March, 1877, was one 
of the earliest college associations 
ever established. On May 17, 1879, 
it took a leading part in the first 
Y. M. C. A. convention of East Ten- 
nessee. J. W. Rankin and S. T. Wil- 
son, representing Maryville, were 
members of a committee appointed 
by this convention "to correspond 
with Christian students in all the 
colleges of Tennessee with a view^ 
to having a Y. M. C. A. established 
in each institution." 

The following explanation of the 
Y movement is found in the circu- 
lar letter the committee sent to the 
colleges of Tennessee: 

"The grand object of the asso- 
ciation is to 'promote spirituality, 
Christian fellowship, and aggres- 
sive work among its members,' to 
teach the Young Christian student 
to bear the yoke in his youth, and 
to bring the unconverted to the 
Saviour. 

"With Christian earnestness we 
urge you to organize and maintain 
an association in your institution 
for God's glory, for your own edifi- 
cation, and for the salvation of 
your comrades." 

The Y. W. C. A. of the College was 
organized in 1884, with similar pur- 
poses. 

The new students are urged to 
unite with these associations and to 
help forward these noble ends of 
service. 

SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON. 



GUIDES FOR NEW STUDENTS 



Coming to a new "home" as you 
are it is the aim of this "M" Book 
to give you as many directions as 
possible for your convenience on 
arriving at Maryville. For we truly 
desire to make College Hill seem 
like a "home" to you. We know 
that after you have been here for 
even a short time a love for the 
College home begins to grow. You 
will no doubt have your problems 
and difficulties in college, as have 
hundreds of other students, and it 
is our purpose in this book to help 
guide you in the best way. 

THE START 

Be sure to get to Maryville on 
time. It is much more pleasant 
and comfortable when one can get 
to M. C. early and get all of the pre- 
liminary work done and so avoid 
the confusion that may come if you 
are late. It will be much to your 
advantage if you can arrange to 
get to Maryville on Monday eve- 
ning, September Sth. You will then 
be ready to get an early start at 
registration and matriculation on 
Tuesday morning. On your arrival 
give your baggage check to the col- 
lege truckman or some member of 
the "Y" service committee, and 
your luggage will be handled free. 

Y. M. and Y. W. reception com- 
mittees meet all of the trains and 
they will be glad to meet you and 
direct you to your hall or give you 
any aid you may need. 



MAIIi SE3RVICE 

A branch of the United States 
postoffice at Maryville is located in 
Anderson Hall. Students should 
have their mail addressed in a man- 
ner similar to the following-; 

Mr. U. S. Wright, 
302 Carneg-ie Hall, 
College Station, 
Maryville, Tenn. 

If you room in town and wish to 
get your mail at the college post- 
office, use only "College Station." 
Outgoing mail is collected from the 
boxes in the dormitories every 
morning and afternoon. 



Get acquainted with your classr 
mates. 



Learn the college songs and 
yells. 



40 



WHO'S WHO IN MARYVILLE 



Alpha Sigma Dewey Eitner 

Athenian Lonnie E. Milling 

Athletic Association. . .Lewis Veech 

Bainonian Martha Anderson 

Baseball George Shanks 

Basketball Robert (Pat) Shores 

Cheer Leaders 

Cragan, Thomson, Usner 

Chilhowean 

Julian Johnson, Editor; Roy Cort- 

ner, Business Manager. 
Highland Echo 

Willard Allen, Editor; Robert 

Carr, Assistant Editor. 

Field Day Lamar Milling 

Football Joe C. Gamble 

Men's Glee Club Raymond Anderson 

Junior Class Robert S. Harvey 

Pi Kappa Delta. . .Lonnie E. Milling 

Senior Closs Robert W. Bishop 

Sophomore Class Lewis Reed 

Student Council 

(Elected in September) 

Theta Epsilon Margaret Lewis 

Track James M. Brown 

Y. M. C. A Charles Johnson 

Y. W. C. A Vera Scales 



11 



TO THE NEW MEN 



For several years you have been 
looking- forward eagerly to the be- 
ginning of your college career, and 
you are to be congratulated that 
your hopes are now to be realized. 
We welcome you into our college 
community, and feel sure that you 
will take advantage of every op- 
portunity here for the further de- 
velopment of yourself. Every priv- 
ilege in life carries with it a respon- 
sibility, and the measure in which 
you live up to the possibilities of 
your college life, largely determines 
your success or failure in life. 

Start your college life right by 
all means. Be here on time and be 
friends with everybody. If you 
don't know a person's name, speak' 
to him anyway, for he may be a 
new student himself. The friendly 
man, and the one with a cheery 
greeting always gets the most out 
of life. Mingle freely with your 
fellows in their social life and form 
many friendships. 

One of the greatest things about 
college life is the people you meet, 
and the personal contacts formed. 
College friendships will mean more 
to you than any others. You will 
have your special buddies, but you 
can be friends with everybody. 

A noted man once said that if a 
man went through his college 
course, and at the end of it could 
not look into the heart of some 
man, and say, "O soul, I am thine," 
and receive the reply, "Yea, soul, 

12 



thou are mine," then that man had 
failed miserably. You will always 
cherish the memory of your college 
buddy, and the many other friend- 
ships you form. 

Take care of your body while you 
are at college. In these years of 
young manhood, your body needs 
the best you can give it. Keep it 
strong and clean, remembering that 
it is the "temple of God." Go out 
for athletics and make your place 
on the team. To stand on the side- 
lines and say you can do better than 
some man on the team is not our 
college spirit. Get into the game 
and fight for old Maryville! 

If you cannot go out for the team 
be sure to take exercise every day. 
A vigorous sweat is needed every 
day to rid the body of waste materi- 
al. College studies are strenuous, 
but don't be a book worm. Exercise 
and build up your body for a full, 
complete life. 

Get into college activities and do 
your best to win the respect of 
your mates. Join a literary society, 
go out for forensics, take an active 
part in the affairs of your class. 
Maryville respects a man who is in- 
terested in the life of the campus, 
and gives her places of honor only 
to those who have demonstrated 
their fitness for the position. 

Study while you are in college, 
not too much, but do more than 
simply get by. You have come to 
college to get an education, and you 
cannot afford to neglect your stud- 
ies. Start the year right, for if you 
do not study the first few days, the 
chances are that you will never be- 



gin. A good beginning is half the 
battle, so put the requisite amount 
of time on your studies. 

Do not neglect your religious life 
while at college. Here you may find 
opportunity to get into Christian 
work, and do so by all means. The 
Christian Associations are here to 
help you, and other organizations 
are here where you can find a place 
to serve, as well as receiving spirit- 
ual uplift. Attend the Sunday af- 
ternoon Y. M, C. A. meetings. They 
are planned to help you with your 
problems. Your college life should 
bring you into closer friendship 
with that Great Friend, Jesus 
Christ. 

College life, you will find, is im- 
mensely busy in its varied activ- 
ities. But strive above all else, to 
live a well proportioned life, that 
the length of your college life, in 
its reach after high purposes, the 
breadth of your college life, in the 
varied interests of all your fellows, 
and the height of your college life, 
in its upward reach to a fuller and 
more personal relationship with our 
heavenly Father, may all be equal. 
If this be attained your college ca- 
reer will leave you a better man, 
and better able to take your place 
in the world of men. 



H' 



Y. M. C. A. 



The objective of the Young Men's 
Christian Association for 1925-26 is: 
a bigger, better Maryville by way 
of the "four-square man" — to aid in 
the development of college men 
physically, spiritually, socially and 
mentally in a Christian way. These 
phases of its program are set forth 
in the publication of the "M" Book. 

Officers 1925-36 

Charles Johnson, '26 President 

Lonnie E. Milling, '26 . . . . Vice-Pres. 

Robert S. Harvey, '27 Secretary 

Dewey Eitner, '26 Treasurer 

Chairmen of Committees 

Robert W. Bishop, '26, 



Religious Meetings 

Gordon Harold, '27 Membership 

Wilbur Franklin. '28 Bible Study 

Ernest Frei, '28 Publicity 

W. B. Jones, Jr., '28 Missions 

P. D. Graybeal, '26 Deputations 

Merlin Usner, '27 Social Service 

Clinton Puff, '26 Music 

Julius Huffman, '26 Delegations 

Raymond Anderson, '26 Lyceum 

Clyde Lippard, '26 Collegian 

Salmon Brown, '26 Social 

Lamar Milling, '27 Athletics 

Robert H. Wood, '27 Blue Ridge 



15 



Membership 

In article two of the Y. M. C. A. 
Constitution we find that there are 
two kinds of membership, active 
and associate. The active member- 
ship consists of men who are mem- 
bers in good standing of evangel- 
ical churches, or professing Chris- 
tians of the Protestant faith, and 
who have been duly received and 
elected by the association. Only 
active members may vote and hold 
office. The associate membership 
consists of any male student of 
good moral standing, who desires 
to join the association. These mem- 
bers are entitled to all privileges 
of membership, except those of vot- 
ing and holding office. Let us get 
together and make this year the 
greatest in the history of Maryville. 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 

The T. M. C. A. Rooms are located 
on the first and second floors of 
Bartlett Hall. You will notice in 
large white letters, "Y. M. C. A." on 
the large window just over the en- 
trance. At the right as you go in 
you will find the "Y" Store where 
stationery, candy, and other con- 
fections can be had. Then next to 
the store, and just around the cor- 
ner, is the "Y" Reading Room, 
where you will find magazines, pa- 
pers, and a Victrola for your use. 
At the left of the entrances is the 
auditorium where the "Y" meetings 
are held. The gymnasium is also 
on the first floor. On the second 
floor is located the offices of the 
president and secretary, who will 
be glad to have you come in and 

16 



get acquainted and to give you any 
assistance that you may desire. 

All of these rooms are for the use 
of all the fellows on the Hill. Make 
use of their advantages and you 
will enjoy your college life more. 

The Friendship Council 

The Friendship Council is a unit 
of the T. M. C. A., and is one of the 
most powerful religious organiza- 
tions on the Hill. The men on the 
council are those who have had re- 
ligious experience, and are sincere, 
earnest, and praying fellows, eager 
to do their part in being a friend to 
man and thus building up the king- 
dom of God right here on the Hill. 
The purpose is expressed in the 
pledge as here given: Through 
prayer and by the Grace of God, 
the Friendship Council aims to 
make every man on College Hill a 
professing Christian, a member of 
some church, and an active Chris- 
tian worker. To accomplish this 
end, I promise to make my life as 
much like that of Jesus as possible, 
to befriend, pray for and help in 
every way possible every man un- 
der my care, to attend every coun- 
cil meeting unless prohibited by a 
satisfactory reason. 

Sunday Meetings of the Y. M. C. A. 

As has been stated the objective 
of the "Y" for the year is "a big- 
ger, better Maryville by way of the 
four-square man." In our regular 
Sunday afternoon meetings we try 
to take care of the spiritual as 
well as the mental side of this ob- 
jective. These meetings are held 

17 



in the Y. M. C. A. auditorium at one 
o'clock and cover a wide variety of 
subjects. Subjects ranging from 
those of a personal nature to dis- 
cussions of world affairs hold our 
attention. All students are given 
an opportunity to express their 
views. This is especially interest- 
ing since so many sections of our 
country and foreign countries are 
represented. Usually a student 
leads the discussion but it is our 
plan for this year to have more 
outside speakers appear before us — 
speakers who have "met and over- 
come" in actual life the hard points, 
as we have found them in our dis- 
cussions. 

So we want you new men to turn 
out on Sunday afternoons and join 
us. 

The two Y's have been big fac- 
tors in making the reputation that 
Maryville now enjoys and, better 
still, in bringing men and women 
into a better understanding and a 
closer relation with their Saviour — 
Jesus Christ. What do you say, 
men? Let's go. You need God and 
God needs you. Let's try to find 
out where He needs us. 

Blue Ridge 

Representatives from the College 
go each summer to Blue Ridge, 
North Carolina, to attend the con- 
ference of all the southern college 
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.'s. At this 
conference about two-thirds of the 
time is spent in listening to ad- 
dresses by the most prominent stu- 
dent speakers in America, and in 
studying the important religious 

18 



and social problems of the day. The 
remainder of the time is spent in 
rest and recreation, such as athlet- 
ics, hikes, etc. The purpose of the 
conference is to make real to col- 
lege men and women the facts of 
Christian experience. 

Blue Ridge is located in one of 
the most beautiful parts of the Blue 
Ridge Mountains, sixteen miles 
east of Asheville, and has the finest 
conference grounds in the South. 
The inspirational lectures and the 
wholesome atmosphere of the place 
leave a lasting impression that is 
worth a year of college work. Next 
June we want a large delegation 
and the "Y" has a loan fund from 
which you can borrow money for 
expenses. 

THE LIFE WORK CONFERENCE 

Truly there has come no greater 
institution on College Hill in late 
years than the Life Work Confer- 
ence. The Life Work Conference, 
held in March under the direction 
of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., 
has been proven a worthy asset to 
the College. It was instituted with 
the belief that we, as students, 
should give consideration to def- 
inite plans for our life work. For 
three days real leaders come and 
give us their time and service in or- 
der to help us decide this great 
question. Leaders in nearly all the 
leading branches of work are rep- 
resented — medicine, law, the minis- 
try, missions, business, agriculture, 
teaching, coaching and a number of 
others. Don't fail to take advan- 
tage of this opportunity when it 

10 



comes. It costs you nothing and the 
returns may be very great. 

FRED HOPE FUXD 

Every spring we have a "Fred 
Hope Campaign drive," conducted 
by the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., 
for the purpose of supporting the 
\vork of one of Maryville's sons in 
the mission field of Africa. Every 
year the student body makes volun- 
tary contributions well over one 
thousand dollars for this work. 



It is a pleasure to give to a worthy 
cause. 



20 



'Y'» ATHLETICS 



Maryville is strong for athle- 
tics — for physical and mental com- 
petition which will build real men. 
And the best thing about athletics 
at Maryville is that there is some- 
thing in which everyone may take 
part. We have different "Varsity" 
teams and of course we all cannot 
make those teams, although every 
one is given a chance, but if we are 
at all interested in athletics we can 
find something in which we can 
take part. There are many branches 
of athletics and there is no reason 
why everybody shouldn't be doing 
something. This is the aim of the 
"Y" — to promote greater interest in 
athletics for all. In the fall there 
are the interclass football games. 
We have a number of tennis courts. 
Then there is swimming, wrestling 
and boxing. During the winter 
months we have the interclass bas- 
ketball games and following these 
we have the intramural basketball 
league. (Last year about 100 men 
took part). Then too there is volley 
ball, tumbling and the regular ap- 
paratus work. In the spring there 
is baseball, more tennis, horseshoes, 
track, hiking. Sure, you can work 
too. Get into some form of athletics 
and keep yourself physically fit. 
You certainly will derive much 
pleasure from your athletic compe- 
tition. L, 



21, 



OtJ< 



do th ^ _j 

H 5 « eoov^ a. ^ 

OeCiM O «0 00 i-H tH O O Tt< 

lT-ICslLftC<l'*T-lrHC<l-*T-ir-ILCI~-lCO»H 



cq 



IIM ^ 

I c » c 



|^J fl' 



OOr-H ' 



OO o C S » C t; o'^t3'^^- 






'd'O 3 






•O ftf 'O nS 

u u u u - ■ ^ ti; 

ooooS SooO_w-.i|CO 

i-IC<|-*00,HC<li-MIMKMf-M|JL(pq 



s 

"^ c 



22 



HIKES 

We will all admit that Nature can 
not be surpassed when it comes to 
real beauty. Will you enjoy the 
hikes at M. C? What a foolish 
thought. Any red blooded boy or 
g-irl loves to get out in the moun- 
tains and along- the clear, fast-flow- 
ing streams anywhere, but the 
mountains of East Tennessee are es- 
pecially beautiful. To view the 
sunrise or the sunset from some 
lofty peak gives a fellow a thrill — a 
feeling of strength and freedom in- 
describable. One of the best hikes 
taken by the college is to the top 
of Thunderhead, a treeless dome in 
the Great Smoky Mountains, 5,700 
feet above sea level. This is usually 
the big "Y" hike of the year and 
you are sure to have many long re- 
membered experiences. Other trips 
are taken to Look Rock. Sunshine, 
Calderwood, Sheep Pen Cave and the 
dam at Cheoa, over which extends 
the longest single span cable in the 
world. All you need is a little "pep" 
and sure, you might need some 
"eats" and a couple of blankets. Get 
your bunch together and go. 



It is better to believe that a man 
does possess good qualities than to 
assert he does not. 



23 



COLLEGE RELIGIOUS MEETINGS 



Maryville's "February Meetings" 
have been heard ©f in many parts 
of our land. A number of colleges 
have adopted this same plan for 
themselves. For ten days each year 
true Christianity is presented in a 
very clear way by a very capable 
speaker. During these meetings 
many new resolutions are made and 
new ideas are set up. 

Maryville also has a full time col- 
lege pastor, Dr. William Patton 
Stevenson, who conducts the Vesper 
services each Sunday evening. The 
special music furnished by the robed 
choir adds much to the impressive 
service. Dr. Stevenson's Thursday 
morning addresses are always very 
interesting and practical. His sub- 
jects are always carefully chosen so 
that they may meet the vital need 
of the student body. 



Friendship is the most sacred 
thing you can have. Do not sacri- 
fice it for personal gain. 



24 



Y. W. C. A. 



Activities of the Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. plays a large part in 
the life of the College Student. 
There is a big Sister Movement in 
which the old girls play the part of 
a big sister to the new girls. Dur- 
ing the first week the Y. W. C. A. 
has a breakfast hike for the new 
girls and a special social program. 
All new girls are members of the 
Nu Gamma. Here each one discusses 
her problems and adds new ideas for 
Y. W. From time to time during 
the year there are socials. In Octo- 
ber the Y. W. puts on a World 
Week of Prayer. At daybreak on 
Easter and Christmas we are awak- 
ened by beautiful carols sung by the 
girls. After February meetings the 
Y. M. and Y. W. have a Life Work 
Conference. 

Sometimes in the spring we have 
a banquet in order to arouse inter- 
est and get as many as will to go 
to the Conference at Blue Ridge. 

On May first the faculty gives a 
half holiday for the May Day Fete. 
This is one of the biggest things of 
the year. 

Come and help us with your ideas 
and talents to make the activities 
of next 3^ear bigger and better than 
ever. 



2S 



Y. W. C. A. "BIG SISTERS*' 

One of the hardest things about 
going- away to college is leaving our 
family behind. But at Maryville. 
new girls aren't entirely without a 
family because they each have a 
"Big Sister." She is a girl who has 
been to Maryville and knows how to 
make her "Little Sister" feel at 
home there. She will write to you, 
new girls, during the summer, and 
we hope that if there are any ques- 
tions you would like to ask concern- 
ing Maryville, you will give her the 
pleasure of answering them. Then 
when you come to Maryville, she 
will be there to welcome you. She 
will help you find your room, help 
you matriculate, and introduce you 
to Maryville. Throughout the year 
she will be a friend who is ready 
both to share your joys and to help 
you face your problems. 

New girls, Y. W. C. A. "Big Sis- 
ters" bid you welcome. 

NU GAMMA SIGMA 

Are you wondering how you will 
get acquainted with everybody at 
college and learn all the important 
places on the campus? Are you 
wondering who is going to keep you 
from being homesick? Is your mind 
just one big question? 

Well, just to comfort you, remem- 
ber there will be many other new 
girls who are asking the same 
questions. These other girls will 
have perhaps entirely different 
ideas and viewpoints from you and 
yet they will want to share their 
thoughts with you and then they'll 
want to share your thoughts. When 

26 



we share our thoughts and our- 
selves with one another we almost 
seem like one great big family. And 
it is a family, a family of new girls 
who are divided up into groups of 
ten who has an old girl for a 
"Mother" or leader. Here we can 
enter into real fellowship that con- 
fides and discusses. The big Mother 
of our family is the Y. W. C. A. and 
Gamma is her favorite daughter and 
she's holding out her arms in wel- 
come to the new girl. Below is the 
way we like to spell our name: 

]SJ EWNESS is one of the charac- 
-'-^ teristics of Nu Gamma, and it 
is always striving to bring new 
thoughts to our new girls' minds. 
TT SEFULNESS also characterizes 
^ Nu Gamma. It is existing only 
to give new girls what they need. 

(^ OOD things the Nu Gamma does 
^^ do, both for old girls and for 
new. 

CTION, too, is in Nu Gamma, be- 
cause it is always on the job. 

OTHER'S love it tries to supply 
in the heart of a homesick 
girl. 

IV/T EETING the spiritual as well as 
^^^ the physical need of a girl is 
its purpose. 

A PPETITES it satisfies, when for 
-'^ the morning hikes we arise. 



2,7 



A 
M 



THE READING ROOM 

"O, what a lovely room. It's the 
most home-like place on the Hill." 
That's what all the girls say of the 
"Y" reading room. You will say 
that too when you see it, and it is 
the first place you must visit when 
you go to Thaw Hall. The high, 
wide windows, the big divans, and 
the comfy upholstered rockers make 
the room just the place to read the 
current topics of the day, classic 
and contemporary prose and poetry, 
religious books, current magazines, 
and student publications, which are 
kept in the "Y" reading room. We 
hope you will come up often and al- 
ways remember we are at your 
service. 

SOCIAIi EVENTS 

The social life at Maryville is well 
provided for and no matter what 
your disposition is there are occa- 
sions you will like. These opening 
entertainments will carry you over 
the time of newness and afford op- 
portunity for getting acquainted 
with your fellow students and to 
get the first glimpse of the Mary- 
ville spirit. 

During the first week of school 
there is a reception for the new 
girls. This is when the fun begins, 
which continues throughout the 
year. Every month there is some 
sort of good time for everybody — in 
the form of hikes, parties. (By the 
way. some of them will be mixed 
parties), twilight sings and various 
other activities. 

In May (usually on the first) 
comes the most beautiful program 

28 



of the whole year, "May Day Fete." 
It is staged in the college woods and 
the chosen beauty of the college 
is crowned "Queen of May." 

We are planning lots of good 
times, so be sure to look Y. W. over 
when you get on the hill. 
Y. W. C. A. SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

3IEETINGS 

Get started right! In other words, 
don't miss the first Y. W. C. A. 
meeting. There are big things we 
want and need in our life. 

First we need an IDEAL — some- 
thing that will make us do our best. 

Second, we want to know FACTS. 
"We want to discuss and act, but it's 
hard to do either intelligently with- 
out knowing facts. "We want prac- 
tical knowledge to which we may 
fasten our ideals. 

Then, too, we want to ACT. At 
this point of living out our beliefs 
we find it necessary to examine our 
philosophies of life to see why they 
are pale and negative, and not vital 
enough to express themselves in ac- 
tions. 

And fourth, we want a new 
Philosophy of life and help in de- 
veloping our spiritual potentialities 
so that we may live up to it. We 
want to get the best out of life. 

Do you want to know more of 
what Jesus' way of life really 
means? Do you want to discover 
with us what our belief in God has 
to do with the fullness and joy of 
our life? 

These questions, and others will 
be taken up in the Sunday meetings, 
which will be vital to the life of 
every wide-awake girl. 

29 



Besides this we are going to try 
to tell you what "T" really is, not 
only on our campus, but all over the 
world. We want you to become part 
of us, and in becoming part of us, 
you will become part of the great 
National Y. W. C. A. whose objective 
is: 

We unite in the determination to 
live unreservedly Jesus' law of love 
in every relationship and so to 
know God. 

OPEN FORUM 

When you come to Maryville you 
are neither going to drop out of the 
world not become a long faced in- 
tellectual grind. You're going to 
realize that j^ou are a part of a 
great big world that's alive with 
interesting things. Instead of tak- 
ing you into a little corner all its 
own Maryville is going to help you 
feel that all over the world every- 
body is everybody else's brother or 
sister . . . We discuss world af- 
fairs in Y. M.. the classroom and 
chapel and in the free-for-all dis- 
cussion group of students that 
studies each week vital problems of 
the United States and of the world. 
From time to time people who real- 
ly know conditions as they are come 
to us, and after listening to them, 
our own viewpoint becomes broad- 
ened. We get to know something 
about the life of the people of other 
nations and how closely they are 
related to us. 

Come on, girls, we want your 
ideas and with all our ideas together 
we'll be ready to go out into the 
world and help solve its problems. 

30 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



STUDENT COUNCIL, 

The Student Council was organ- 
ized for the purpose of furnishing 
a representative body of students, 
who, by virtue of their position and 
influence in student affairs, shall 
be able to express the sentiment of 
the student body. They co-operate 
with the Faculty in maintaining- 
Maryville College ideals and strive 
to put into execution such proposals 
which shall be for the best welfare 
of the school. 

The Council is composed of eight 
Seniors, six Juniors, four Sopho- 
mores and four Freshmen who take 
up matters brought before them for 
consideration. Any student may 
confer with his representative and 
present any inatter which he thinks 
would be for the welfare of the stu- 
dent body. 

The Student Council is not stu- 
dent government, but it seeks to 
summarize student opinion and to 
work with the Faculty in promoting 
desirable measures and prevent ac- 
tions which are detrimental to the 
college. With the co-operation of 
all the students the Student Council 
will be an organization which will 
be of permanent and lasting value 
to the students. 

ALPHA SIGMA 

Membership in the Alpha Sigma 
Literary Society should be the goal 
of every new man who is to attend 
Maryville. The Alpha Sigma spirit 

31 



of good fellowship has won for the 
society the highest respect. The 
popularity of the organization is 
demonstrated by the fact that men 
m every rank of college activities 
belong. 

Not only does the society provide 
a democratic medium through which 
to make friends, and enable mem- 
bers to stand with composure while 
speaking, but it offers a thorough 
training for prospective debate can- 
didates. 

Our men have stood for clean 
competition in all college activities. 
In the admittance of new members, 
quality and not quantity has been 
the guiding principle. A policy of 
co-operation has always been pre- 
valent in Alpha Sigma and especial- 
ly have we endeavored to co-operate 
with our sister society, Theta Ep- 
silon. The society has ideals that 
are harmonious with those of the 
college, and the chief aim has al- 
ways been loyalty to old Alma Ma- 
ter. Greater achievements ' and 
higher attainments are the ambi- 
tion of the present membership. 

Prospective students, we, the Al- 
pha Sigma Literary, extend to you 
a hearty welcome to join us. 

BAINONIAN 

The Bainonian Literary Society is 
one of the oldest literary organiza- 
tions for girls on the hill. It was 
organized in 1S75, and ever since 
that time has been an important 
factor in the student life. The 
Bainonians are noted for their loy- 
alty and enthusiasm for their socie- 
ty and high Christian ideals. It is 

33 



the purpose of the society to develop 
a hearty Christian fellowship among 
its members and to gve them such 
training- as will enable them to se- 
cure the very best development of 
talents. Every Saturday night a 
program full of pep and life and at 
the same time instructive is given. 
Every year the society gives a play. 
Twice during the year joint meet- 
ings are held with the brother so- 
ciety, the Athenians. Bainonians 
stand for social as well as literary 
training. Every Bainonian extends 
a cordial welcome to all new girls. 
Home-sickness w^ill flee when 
Bainonian and the college spirit 
creep in. New girls, we extend to 
you our hearty invitation to come 
and be one of us and help to crown 
the year twenty-five and twenty-six 
with the greatest success. 

ATHESflAlV 

The Athenian Literary Society 
holds the distinction of being the 
oldest literary organization on "The 
Hill," having been organized in the 
year 1869. Its present membership 
enrolls a large proportion of the 
male students of the college — a 
bunch of fellows who have the best 
interests of their Alma Mater at 
heart. Loyalty is the strong point 
of Athenian. 

The ideal of Athenian is to give 
her members such training as will 
enable them to secure the very best 
development during their college 
days; and to promote a correct col- 
lege spirit and love for Alma Mater. 
This end is accomplished by provid- 
ing weekly programs of an inter- 

33 



esting-, instructive and varied nature 
suiting- the tastes of the various in- 
dividuals. We try to give every fel- 
low a chance in Athenian. Last 
year approximately eighty fellows 
were given the opportunity to take 
part in a meeting in some manner. 
This training has been the main 
factor in choosing three fourths of 
the members of the Men's Forensic 
League, and the two men partici- 
pants in the oratorical contests rep- 
resenting the college to be selected 
from Athenian. 

The Athenian Literary Society ex- 
tends a hearty welcome to all of the 
new men. Come to our opening so- 
cial at the beginning of the year. 
Visit us. If you like us, join us. 
We want you and we believe that 
we can give you what you want. 

THETA EPSILON 

Some one said not long ago that 
fraternities mean more to a college 
man than his studies. Maryvill'e 
has neither fraternities nor sorori- 
ties, but we do have something that 
more than compensates for them — ^ 
our literary societies. Theta Epsilon 
is one of the girl's societies and it 
is a wonderful means by which to 
make friends, enjoy social life, and 
benefit culturally. We Thetas are 
proud of what our society has done 
in the past, and the mid-winter 
plays of the past two years. "Lit- 
tle Women" and "Smiling Through" 
have won her an enviable name on 
the Hill. We are making great 
plans for 1925-'26 too; a great mid- 
winter, lots of snappy programs, 
and plenty of good times socially. 

34 



(Not the least of these are our joint 
meeting-s with our "brothers" — the 
Alpha Sigmas. Wait until you know 
them!) But one event in the year 
outshadows all else — the coming of 
the new girls! One good thing 
Theta does is to wear off the new 
feeling early and impart that con- 
sciousness of real fellowship w^ith 
the old girls. Theta doors are open 
to every new girl who w^ill come in 
and do her part to make Theta bet- 
ter next year, and every Theta 
stands ready to lead you inside into 
real intimacy. So one and all we 
welcome you new girls! 

DEBATE AND ORATORY 

Debate and oratory have always 
held a prominent place in the stu- 
dent activities at Maryville. Mary- 
ville is a member of both the Ten- 
nessee and East Tennessee Oratori- 
cal leagues and has always ranked 
high in the annual contests. 

The college annually engages in a 
number of inter-collegiate debates. 
Last year's schedule included de- 
bates with Berea, King and Tuscu- 
lum. These debating teams are open 
for all college students. The girls 
and boys each have their own teams. 
The Girls' teams had a dual debate 
with girls from the U. T. Last year 
the Freshman boys had a dual be- 
bate with the University of Tennes- 
see. We may well be proud of our 
debaters and orators at M. C. for 
they are hard workers and always 
make a good showing. Naturally we 
want you new students to go out 
for Forensics as well as athletics. 



Keep first things first. 
35 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

One of the most pleasing- organi- 
zations on the Hill is the Men's 
Glee Club. Its popularity is grad- 
ually growing throughout East Ten- 
nessee as well as in Maryville. 
Never before has the Glee Club at- 
tempted so extensive a program as 
that of the 1924-1925 season, and 
never has its program been so suc- 
cessfully carried to completion. Con- 
certs were given at Harriman, 
Johnson City, Greenville, Knoxville 
and a number of other places, the 
season's program finally winding up 
with the big event of the year — 
the concert at Maryville. Raymond 
Anderson as president is planning 
an even better program for next 
year. To be a member of the Glee 
Club a man has to be able to sing 
with a fair degree of accuracy. "Will 
you try out next year? 

THE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

The Ministerial Association exr 
tends hearty greetings to all new^ 
students. This association, or- 
g-anized in 1900, is composed of those 
students who are candidates for the 
Christian Ministry. It has for its 
object the enlistment of its mem- 
bers in various forms of active 
Christian work and the discussion 
of themes relating to the work of 
the ministry. Opportunities for per- 
sonal w^ork, either in the mission, 
jail, or in the rural districts are 
numerous. The Association invites 
all new students interested in the 
ministry to attend our meetings. 



The only way to secure friends is 
to be one. 



STUDENT VOIiUNTEERS 

From its earliest history the Col- 
lege has been identified with for- 
eign missions and has sent out 
eighty-four missionaries into seven- 
teen foreign countries. 

Since 1894 the students have main- 
tained a Student Volunteer Band, 
composed of those who have been 
naturally drawn together with the 
intention of serving on the foreign 
field. The Band meets weekly, so 
if you are considering this form of 
service in any degree come to our 
meetings and thereby strengthen 
your interest. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

Do you like to attend good dra- 
matic performances? If you do you 
certainly will enjoy the plays given 
by the "Maryville Players." This 
club has undoubtedly established a 
permanent place for itself among 
the principal activities at Maryville. 
Last year they presented Booth 
Tarkington's "Seventeen" and real 
talent was displayed. This club of- 
fers an invaluable opportunity to 
talented students. Each year a 
number of the "Players" are lost 
through graduation so there is al- 
ways a good chance for new stu- 
dents. 



Don't fail to attend the Y. W. C. A. 



The "Y" needs your help and you 
can be helped by it. 



37 



LAW CLUB 

Say, fellows, are you interested in 
law? Well, then, come around to 
our meetings. The purpose of the 
Law Club is to help its members to 
familiarize themselves with the 
features of their contemplated life 
work and to develop high moral 
standards and ideals in connection 
with their profession. 

The programs are made up mostly 
of mock trials, parliamentary drill 
and lectures on various phases of 
law. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 

One of the best and largest musi- 
cal organizations on the Hill is the 
College Band. Fellows who possess 
a fair knowledge of band music 
should be sure to join early. The 
band furnishes music at many en- 
tertainments and athletic contests. 
Concerts and parades also draw 
many appreciative hearers. 

HI-TRAIL CLUB 

The Hi-Trail Club was organized 
for the purpose of developing phy- 
sical strength, increasing the 
knowledge of and love for the 
"Great Outdoors." The membership 
in this club is restricted to twelve 
men. To become a member of the 
Hi-trail Club one must have had at 
least one hundred miles of hiking 
experience and must present a 
thesis giving an account of such ex- 
periences and then be unanimously 
elected by the members. 



3& 



PRE-MEDICAL CLUB 

Students preparing for the prac- 
tice of medicine have organized with 
a view to a better understanding of 
the problems and interests of the 
medical profession. 

Its purpose is also to cultivate 
mutual fellowship. 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

The Chemistry Club is composed 
of students who are taking more 
than one year of college chemistry. 
One year of chemistry is required 
for membership. Papers and lec- 
tures are given on the chemical 
problems of the day by the students 
and professors of the department. 

STATE CLUBS 

"We have thirty-two different 
states represented at Maryville so 
naturally the students from the 
"Home State" should group to- 
gether and form state clubs. The 
primary purpose of these clubs is 
the furthering of good spirit and 
friendship of those who are from 
the same section of the United 
States. Outside of the state of Ten- 
nessee itself "Ole Alabam" has the 
largest club, although Ohio is a close 
second. You are sure to join your 
state club. 



39 



COIiLEGE PUBIilCATION 



The Chilhowean 

Have you seen last year's Chil- 
howean — the college annual? You 
will enjoy looking it over. It is a 
summary of the year's events at 
Maryville mostly in picture form. 

The college days are never forgot- 
ten and how pleasant it is to bring 
back those old days by gazing at 
the pages of that old annual. The 
Junior Class puts out the annual 
each year and they always strive 
for perfection, trying each year to 
make the new annual an improve- 
ment over the old one. Julian John- 
son as Editor and Roy Cortner as 
Business Manager, have charge of 
the 1926 edition of the Chilhowean. 

The Highland Echo 

The Highland Echo is the weekly 
publication of Maryville College. It 
is a four page (sometimes more), 
five column paper, to which every 
student subscribes when he matricu- 
lates. The editor is elected in the 
spring of each year from the mem- 
bers of the Senior and Junior classes 
and by the entire student body. The 
business manager is appointed by 
the editor. 

The Echo is constructed much 
after the fashion of larger newspa- 
pers, containing editorials, news 
items, athletic reports and other 
articles of interest to the student 
body and Alumni of M. C. By means 
of this publication every student 
and ex-student is able to keep in 
touch with all of the activities on 
College Hill. The Editor-in-chief 

40 



for the coming year is Willard Al- 
len, '26, and Robert Carr, '26 is As- 
sistant Editor. 

The "Y" Bee 

The "Y" Bee is published by the 
Y. M. C. A. It is an announcement of 
the week's program for the "Y." 
Ernest J. Frei is the editor for the 
B. Jones, Jr. 

The Maryville College Handbook 

The "M" Book, as the Handbook 
is usually called, is the book you 
are now reading. It is issued by 
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. each 
year. Its aim is to give new stu- 
dents a brief outline of the activi- 
ties at M. C. The Editor is Robert 
S. Harvey, Associate Editor, Hilda 
Harris, Business Manager, William 
B. Jones, Jr. 



Attend the Y. M. C. A. meetings. 



41 



ATHLETICS 



Maryville is represented by teams 
in every major college sport, and 
ranks with the leaders in this sec- 
tion of the country. The adminis- 
trative control of athletics is cen- 
tered in the Athletic Association. 

With L. S. Honaker and "Bob" 
Thrower as coaches of Maryville 
athletics, and hard fighting teams 
composed of loyal men, it is no 
wonder that the Athletic Associa- 
tion has made such a stride forward 
during the last two years. A new 
day has dawned for Maryville in 
athletics because she has two live 
coaches, plenty of good material, 
added equipment, and a splendid 
new field. 

FOOTBALL 

For the past four years Maryville 
has been in the foreground in Col- 
lege Athletics in the South. This 
is especially true in respect to foot- 
ball. During the past four years 
Maryville has met such teams as 
the University of Kentucky, the 
University of Tennessee, Mercer 
University, King College and St. 
Xavier College. The football sea- 
son just past was a successful one 
for Maryville. Not only was it a 
successful season from the stand- 
point of games won and lost, but it 
was a success in the training of 
men. Maryville has the name of 
having the best conditioned team in 
this section. Football at Maryville 
is an institution. Its purpose is not 

42 



m 
2 


to 

<i> 

S3 
O 
G 

P. 

o 




















! 


8 
m 

Oi 

r-l 






















1 

i 

1 

1 


B 

8 


CO 

C 

0) 

c 
o 

ft 
ft 
O 


o 

tc 
c 

X 

o 
c 

o 
> 

p 


a; 

s 

o 


> 

o 

c 

Eh 

tw 
O 

> 

'H 


a; 

s 

o 
o 


o 

M 

W 

o 
U 


'be 

Ol 

ft 
m 

Ol 

'C 
c 


01 

s 

o 

o 

o 

U 

c 

o 

hD 
o 




0> 

£ 
o 

A 

<A 

0) 

> 

I 

C 
O 

S 

:3 
O 


o 

u 
o 

s 

s 

Oi 

o 
o 

c 

2 


1 

i 

i 
1 

o» 
S 
o 

1 

•1 

o 

O 1 

C ! 
O i 
O i 

1 




0) 


ft 

a; 


CO 

o 
O 


' o 

■ o 

. C 


O 


cq 

o 
O 


CO 

o 

O 


> 

o 


> 

o 


o 


z 



43 



only to win games but its main pur- 
pose is to make men — winning men. 
The prospects for a winning team 
for this fall are very encouraging. 
We lost only three men by gradua- 
tion. Each of the remaining men 
has expressed his intention of re- 
turning to school. This year shall 
truly be Maryville's Best. 

BASKETBALL. 

Basketball, like track, is rapidly 
becoming one of the most popular 
sports at Maryville. Last year both 
the boys and girls had fast and 
skillful aggregations. Perhaps the 
greatest honor won by the girls was 
in the setback they handed the U. T. 
team at Knoxville. 

One of the most exciting games 
played by our men was the one with 
Tennessee when the Orange and 
Garnet team trounced the Vols 29- 
21. Another very exciting game 
was the one w^ith the Crimson tide 
from the University of Alabama. 
With six letter men returning next 
year and with the abundance of new 
material w^hich will show up next 
fall, Maryville should continue her 
brilliant record of the last three 
seasons. 

BASEBALL 

Baseball has always been one of 
the most popular sports at Mary- 
ville. In baseball as well as in all 
other sports Maryville has held her 
own with leading teams of the 
South and North as well, for M. C. 
defeated the Ohio State University 
team in the opening battle of the 
"'25" season. During the same sea- 
son Maryville "Swatters" succeeded 

44 



in downing- the ancient foe U. T. in 
two games out of a series of three. 
Other teams met by Maryville dur- 
ing the past season were: Cumber- 
land, King- and the Knoxville 
"Smokies." Only one letter man has 
been lost to the team for this year, 
so we should have a real winner for 
'26. Boost baseball! 

TRACK 

Track and field sports are just 
beginning to take their rightful 
place in Southern College Athletics. 
To say merely that this branch of 
sport is on the incline at Maryville, 
is putting it much too mildly. 

There is always a large group of 
Cinder artists who aspire for Mary- 
ville winged honors. Last season 
sixteen were awarded the winged 
"M." Many of these men will be 
here for the spring of '26. Last sea- 
son Maryville had meets with Se- 
wanee, Georgetown, University of 
Tennessee and the University of 
Chattanooga. We won two out of 
these four meets, losing to Sewanee 
and Tennessee by a very close count. 

TENNIS 
Tennis is growing rapidly in pop- 
ularity at Maryville. Last year we 
had on our schedule the University 
of Tennessee, Tusculum, and East 
Tennessee State Normal. In this 
sport, as in the others, we are pro- 
ducing winning teams. The pros- 
pects are good for a good season 
this coming year. 



4S 



•o 




G .M 




O WO 


m 


o-s fl 


rs 


'5 o aj -o "5 - 


O 


13 ift m w C !:;._ 


a 


seconds. 
2-5 seco 
seconds. 

min. 5 1- 

min. 52 S( 
min. 41 
2-5 seco 
4-5 seco 

feet 1 1-2 
feet. 

ft. 1 in. 

eet 6 in. 

ft. 2 in. 


m 






eoe<i o«o<« <M «)_| 


t- 


O oq irt cq rt- ,H rH M tH iH tH iH 


CO ^ 


'til 1 1 II ^'-l'-"^*^ 
I m 0) OJ OJ OJ <i; 01 1 1 1 


il 


|SSSSSSS.2.2.2.2.2 


g .2 


ehShSe^e^hhppqqq H Q 


.... • -la • 


il-- 


^ecia _^ -eoifl • • n • 


o2^ 


_,(M(MUS-*lfl "M-sa • - • 


S^=^ 


shmock, ': 
cGinley. ' 
tiomson, ' 
ing, J., '2 
ing, J., '2 
smplin, '2 
dsall, '25 
cGinley, ' 
hrower, ': 
rock, '25 
utler, '15 
cDonald, 
ush. '15 . 


02 




o or 


M^HMWHBSHwmSfoSHj;^ 



I Cn CQ CO 0} 
*© 'O 'O 'O 



3 S 



5§-S& 






1 ,H (M -* 00 i-l(M rH <M CC MJM CQ tH I 



46 



CONSTITUTION OF MARYVILLE 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE VII 

1. The following students shall 
be permitted to wear the Marj^ville 
"M:" 

a. Members of the varsity foot- 
ball team who have played fifteen 
quarters, b. Members of the varsity 
baseball team who have played as 
much as five innings per game in 
one-half of the scheduled games; or 
a baseball pitcher who has pitched 
forty-five innings in scheduled 
games, c. Members of the varsity 
basketball team who have played 
one-half a game in each of the 
scheduled games, d. Members of the 
varsity track team winning first 
place in a dual meet, or in any other 
meet where three or more colleges 
are competing, e. Members of the 
varsity tennis team playing in one- 
half the tournaments of the year. 

2. The football "M" shall be an 
eight-inch block "M," the baseball 
"M" a seven-inch straight "M," the 
basketball "M" a six-inch block 
"M;" the girls' basketball "M" a 
five-inch block "M" with wings at- 
tached, and the tennis "M" shall be 
a script "M." 

3. All members of the second 
football, baseball, or basketball 
teams may wear the Maryville Mon- 
ogram. 

6. No other students shall wear 
either the "M" or Maryville Mono- 
gram. 

47 





1 


















1 
















fa 
s 


















1 

s 



















H 
















5C 


1 
§ 
















H 


OJ 

o 

CO 
00 


^ 

o 


o 

d 


c 




o 


o 
c 

15 



48 



flllllllllltllllMrntlllllMIMIIIIItlllllMltlllltlllllMIMirilMMMIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIlin 

Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 

A Nation is as Strong as 
Its Churches 

Its Churches are as Strong as 
Its Ministers 

Its Ministers are as Strong as 
Its Theological Seminaries 

Columbia Seminary has entered 
upon a new era. It will be removed 
to Atlanta in the fall of 1927. With 
new equipment, a strong faculty, 
comprehensive courses, in the 
heart of the South, Columbia Sem- 
inary offers superior advantages. 

RICHARD T. GILLESPIE, 
President 



llllllllMllllllllIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIilMlllllliltllllilllllltlMII 

49 



1 

i 
































£ 

s 
.a 

H 
















1 

e 
















1 

s 
H 
















1 
















1 


oi 


d 


o 
d 


o 
in 




o 
o 


o 
o 



50 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

CHURCH DIRECTORY 

New Providence Presbyterian 

Corner College and Main Streets 

First Baptist 

Depot and High Streets 

Methodist Episcopal South 

East Main Street 

Methodist Episcopal 

East Main Street 

Christian 

College Street 

Friends 

West Main Street 



51 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllilllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllll 

Minute 
Please! 



BEFORE 

MAKING YOUR 

PURCHASE, PLEASE 

CONSULT THIS HAND BOOK. 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

AND TELL THEM YOU SAW 

THEIR AD IN THIS 

BOOK. DON'T 

FORGET. 



llllllllllllllllllllllllirillllllllllMIIIIIIIIMIHIHIIIIIIIMNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII 

52 



MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIMIIIIIIIIIIiliniUIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllinillllllllllllllllllMI 



Service That Satisfies 




"SCRAMBLES" McREYNOLDS 
RAY FOWLER 

COME HERE 

For the Many Little Things You Need 

Coat Hangers, Waste Baskets, Soap 
Boxes, Wash Cloths, Curtain 
Rods, Towel Bars, Hair Nets, 
Toilet Articles, School Sup- 
plies and Stationery 

We Appreciate Your Patronagre and Save 
You Money 

WRIGHT'S 10c STORE 

"Where a Little Money Goes a 
Long Way" 



llllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllilltlllllllllllliiilllllllMIII 

53 



Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitriiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

R. F. Graf J. R. Graf 

H. R. Graf 

R. F. Graf & Sons 

ARCHITECTS 

and 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS 



Members of the American Institute 
of Architects, Licensed Archi- 
tects and Engineers of the 
State of Tennessee 



Knoxville, Tenn. 

liuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiii 
54 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlltllMIIIIIIMIiritllllllllMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

LANE 

Theological Seminary 



CINCINNATI 

Has Sent and is Sending: Workers Into 

Every Field of Presbyterian 

Church Activity 

FOR INFORjVIATION ADDRESS 
THE SEMINARY 



BAUM'S 

Home of Flowers, Inc. 
KNOXVrLIvE, TENN. 



Flowers to ^111 the World by AVire 
Robert W. Bishop, Our College Represen- 
tative, (319 Carnegrie Hall), who will 
give you information as to suitable ar- 
rangrements, prices, etc. 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

Back Home and Anywhere 

BY TEIiEGRAPH— ASK BOB! 

.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

55 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

HOW TO FIND THE BEST DRUG 
STORE IN TOWN 

Ask Anyone Who Was Here 
Last Year, Thej^ Will Say 

Badgett-Costner^s 



Three Doors Below Palace Theatre 

Printing, Engraving, Stationery 
and School Supplies 

YOUR PATKONAGE IS APPRECIATED 

ENTERPRISE 
STATIONERY STORE 

JAS. B. HEDGE, JR., Owner 



Our Store is Headquarters for 
FLORSHEIM SHOES, INTER- 
WOVEN SOX, CURLEE CLOTHES 

In Fact, Everything in 

MEN'S and WOMEN'S WEAR 

We Appreciate Your Trade 

BADGETT STORE CO. 

tllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllllillllllllllMilMIIIIIIIIIIIUIIillllllllllllllll 

66 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiii I iiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Just "Say It With Flowers" 

and 
Send Her a Beautiful Box 



ir Craft 



Incorporated 
Journal Bldg^. KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



EUREKA SHOE SHOP 

Beneath Evans Hotel 

HALF SOLES 
RUBBER HEELS 
REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS 

COLLEGE 

TRADE APPRECIATED 

Our Agent Will Call for and Deliver 

Your Work 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Prices Right 

C. R. WILLIAMS 

lllirillllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllllllllllilllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMItlHMIilllillll 

57 



iiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiriii 

Y. W. C. A. Store 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 

CANDIES 

CANNED GOODS 

SALTED PEANUTS 

CHEWING GUM 

SANDWICHES 

ICE CREAM 

HAIR NETS 

PIES 

"When a feller needs a friend" 
The "Y" Store will be the one 



AI.L PROCEEDS GO TO THE BLUE 

RIDGE LOAN FUND OF THE 

Y. W. C. A. 



IllUilllllllliUllllllllilllilillllllllllllllllllllllllliUlllllllillUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUII 

58 



Jhet^oums Joremosf 
Colle^e^unnualC^ 



""^ ^ ^^fl34i^^l^|RTH - AVE - N. 




DESffiNE«S^^ ENGRAVERS 

--i==C>r^:=^-°-OF THE "•■. 

BEST SOUTHERN ANNUALS 



59 



lllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllMMIIIHIillllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllHIIIIJI 

FREE TRAINING IN 

The Moody Bible Institute 

OF CHICAGO 

REV. JAMES M. GRAY, T). D., President 

Founded by the Great Evangelist and 

Christian Educator, D. 1,. Moody, 

in 1886 

General — The object of the Institute is 
expressed in the service rendered by its 
students in all parts of the world, who 
are pastors, pastors' assistants, evange- 
lists, missionaries, teachers, directors of 
religious education, gospel singers, T. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. secretaries, rescue 
mission superintendents, deaconesses and 
workers in Sunday Schools and boys' and 
girls' clubs. 

Educational Department — This is di- 
vided into Day, Evening and Correspond- 
ence Schools. The General Course of the 
Day School is covered in two years. Its 
enrollment last year was 1,160. Five 
other courses are Missionary, Pastors, 
Religious Education, Jewish Missions arid 
Swedish-English. Advanced work is tak- 
en in these courses covering longer per- 
iods of time. 

The Evening School permits students 
to take work equivalent to the Day 
School, making them eligible to the same 
diploma, though it necessarily covers a 
longer period of time. A shorter course 
is possible, however, leading to a certifi- 
cate. The enrollment last year was 1,089. 

The Correspondence School is for those 
who cannot attend the Institute in per- 
son. Ten courses are offered covering 
different methods of Bible Study, Prac- 
tical Christian Work, Evangelism, Chris- 
iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iii 

60 



MIIIIIHItllMIIMMIIIIIIPIItlHIIIIIIHIMIIiriUIMIMIIMIIIMIIIillllllllllilllKlirilllll 

tian Evidences, Fundamentals of the 
Faith and Missions. The last two have 
been added recently. For each of these 
courses a limited fee is charged. The 
enrollment last year was 2,674, which 
made a total active membership of 9,807. 

Extension Department — This supplies 
Bible teachers, evangelists and gospel 
singers for church and mission work, and 
also conducts Bible conferences, music 
classes and evangelistic meetings where- 
ever called for. 

Moody Bible Institute Monthly — This 
is a periodical devoted to Bible knowl- 
edge and interpretation; news and meth- 
ods of world-wide Christian work; edi- 
torial comment on current events and 
conditions; inspirational verse and se- 
lected miscellany. It is catholic in spirit 
and outlook; evangelical and evangelis- 
tic. Issued monthly, $2.00 a year, to 
any address. Rev. James M. Gray, D. D., 
editor. 

Catalog of the Day and Evening 
Schools and Prospectus of the Corre- 
spondence School mailed free. Sample 
copies of the Monthly mailed free. 

Address 

THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 
153 Institute Place — Chicago, 111. 



Eat at Reagan's 



iiiiiiiiiriitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiriiiiiiiMiniiiiniiiiiniiiii 
61 



iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiMi 

Intott 5Il|f nlogtral 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



AMPLE SCHOLARLY 

EQUIPMENT FACULTY 



SPECIALTY 

The Making of Practical Preache'rs 

for World Wide Evangelization 



Maryville College and Union 

Seminary have served the 

same field for more than 

one hundred years 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit;iiii 
62 



I'liiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Yom 

strike 

the Athletic 



HIIIIIIIIIIUII 



youwantaf 




74 NORTH BROAD ST. 
ATLANTA, GA. 



Knoxville 
Lithographing Co. 

Publishers of AM Kinds of 

COLLEGE CATALOGS 
and ANNUALS 



"The Place Where They Keep the 
Quality Up" 

iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiidiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiitiiiiiiiiiiiuuiii 
63 



iiiiiiiiMiiniiiiiriiiiiiMiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii 

RECOGNIZED FOR YEARS 
AS 

COLLEGE ANNUAL 
HEADQUARTERS 



Benson Printing Co. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



The 1926 Chilhomean Will Be 
Printed by Us 

.llllllllillilllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllMIHIIItllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllHIIIIIIIIIIII 

64 



IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMinillllMlllllillllllllllllllllllillMlltllilllllllliaillllll: 

Hope Brothers 

JEWELERS 

Diamond Merchants 

Optometrists 

Stationers Engravers 

ja , ; f 519 Gay St. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
Established 1868 

Correct Apparel 

For Men and Women Students and 
ALWAYS AT POPULAR PRICES 

S. H. GEORGE & SON 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

S. E. CRAWFORD 

DENTIST 
First National Bank Building: 

:iiiiiUMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil 



MIIIIIII.IIU!|U|lllll|Uill>ll"*>l»><"l"l">>l>l<>*l»<l»ll>il>"l>ll"»l>>"»'«)»»l' 

C. C. WHITE 

Collegre Street 

FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING 

"I Heel You and Save Your Soles" 

CLAUDE C. SMITH 

READY-TO-WEAR STORE 
305 Main St. Come See Us 

CHANDLER-SINGLETON 
COMPANY 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

THE HOM£ OF TltUE ECONOMY 

NORTON HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE 
SPORTING GOODS 

WHERE YOUR PATRONAGE IS 
APPRECIATED 



IIIKIMItllllllllMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIiniltlMltllllMlttllllllMIMIIIIIIIirilllllltlllMIIIMI 

HANNAH'S 

"ALL THE NEW ONES 
ALL THE TIME" 

JOHNSON STORE CO. 

"THE LITTLE STORE WITH 
BIG VALUES" 



HUFF BROTHERS & 
^^ McCAMPBELL 

Everything: for Men and Women In 

FANCY SLLKS, DRESS GOODS 

and SHOES 



H. P. HUDDLESTON 

DENTIST 
Wells Building 

nitiiiiiiiititiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiimniimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiriiiiiiMii 
67 



iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiii 

LUKE'S 

Candy Kitchen 

FOR BETTER 

CONFECTIONS i; 

AND 

SANDWICHES 

WELCOME! 

We Welcome Our Friends 

Both Old and New to the "Hill" and 

WE WISH YOU ALL A 

PLEASANT AND PROF- 

ITABLE YEAR 

PROFFIT'S 

Always Ready to Serve You 

"The Best Place to Trade" 

itiiiEiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiti 
6?., 



MIIHiriltlMIIMIIIIIHIIIIIMIMIIIIMIIMIIIHIIIIIIIIIMirillllillllllllllllllllillllllllll 



The Webb Studio 




Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 



KODAK FINISHING 

A SPECIALTY 



The Best is the Cheapest Always 

IIHIIMIIllllllllinillMlllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlilllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

69 



iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiimiiiirmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii 

O. B. HARRIS 

(Behind Birchfield's) 

RENT A NEW FORD 

DRIVE IT YOURSELF 

Coupes, Roadsters, Touring Cars 

PHONE 132— PEOPLES 

MORTON TAXI SERVICE 

KENT A FORD AND DRIVE IT 
YOUKSELrF 

We Have Roadsters, Coupes 
and Touring Cars 
GOOD CARS, CAREFUL DRIVERS 
and 
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN 
AVE GUARANTEE OUR SERVICE 
When a driver fails to please you, report 
him to the managers. We allow no over- 
charges knowingly. Our passengers are 
protected by the best insurance that 
money can buy. 
RIDE WITH MORTON AND . 

PLAY SAFE 

I^ocated Next to Knox Ellis Filling 

Station— 700 College St. 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

Both Phones 71 

TREMAN KING & CO. 

ITHACA, N. Y. 

Outfitters to Marj^ille 

and over 500 other schools and colleges 

"Everything for Athletics" 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS 

iiiiiiiniiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ii 
70 



llllilllllllllllilllllllllllllillMIIIIIMItlllllMillllillllllillllllllMllllllllllllilllllllll 

M. DUKE 

Merchant Tailor and Dry Cleaner 

Cleaner of All Kinds of 
Wearing Apparel 

FOR LADIES and GENTLEMEN 

Practical Up-to-Date Work 

Guaranteed 

PEOPLES PHONE 94 

Or Better Still Look Up Girl or Boy 
Agent on the Hill 



WE CAN BEAT THE BEST 
TEN REAL BARBERS 

SERVICE BARBER SHOP 

Patronize Our Advertisers 



illUllltltllllUlintlMMIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllilllMlllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

71 



iiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiih 

Maryville Furniture 
Company 

We Furnish Your Home 
Complete 

Large Assortment of Stand Frames 
in Stock 

BRING US YOUR PICTURE 
FRAME WORK 

Everything Good to Eat 
M. M. ELDER 

Cash Carry Store 

103 MAIN ST. 



"Self Service is the Best 
Service" 

IIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlillllllllllMlintMlllllllllltlllllHIIIIIIIIMIHI 

72 



imtii!iiiiiiiiMiMiiri;iriiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iii!iiiiiriiiiiii[iiniiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiii 



Y.M.C.A. STORE 



STANDS FOR SERVICE 



CANDIES 

PASTRIES 

ICE CREAM 

and 

COLLEGE NECESSITIES 



WE ARE ALWAYS GLAD TO 
SEE YOU 

W. GORDON HAROLD, 
Manager 

lllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllillliiillllllllllll 

73 



;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiMtiiiinMiiiriiiiMiii>iiti!iiiiiiiiiiMii!iiiitiiiiii 

Maryville College 

Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D., LL. D., 
President 

One Hundred and Seventh Year 
Begins September 8, 1925 

Educational standards of the highest. 
Environment positively Christian. Ex- 
penses lowest possible. 

Enrollment, 616 young men and young 
women; 291 came from thirty-seven 
states and countries outside of Tennes- 
see. Faculty of eighty-six professors, in- 
structors, and assistants. 

EndowTnent and property, $1,850,000.00. 
Campus, 250 acres. Sixteen large build- 
ings, including the new Thaw Memorial 
Hall. 

Entrance requirements, for admission 
to the Freshman class, fifteen standard 
suits. Departments: College, Bible 

Training, Home Economics, Pre-Medical, 
Teachers', Expression, Music and Art. 

Expenses: Tuition, $30 a year. Room 
rent for each student, with two in a 
room, averages $38 a year. Board. $3.50 
i week. Text-books rented. General li- 
Drary free. Self-help opportunities. Full 
information sent upon request. Address 

CLINTON H. GILLINGHAM, D. D. 

Registrar 

aiARYVrLLE, TENNESSEE 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIItMIIIIMIIIIIillllllltllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINir 

74 



iiiiiiii^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiMiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiii|» 



MARYVIIiLE-KNOXVILLE 

Touring Car Schedule 
CARS LE3AVE 



MARYVILLE i 


KNOXVILLE 


Ellis 


Filling 


713 S 


Gay St 


Static 


n: 


7:30 


a. 


m. 


5:15 


a. 


m. 


8:10 


a. 


m. 


5:30 


a. 


m. 


8:50 


a. 


m. 


6:00 


a. 


m. 


9:30 


a. 


m. 


6:30 


a. 


m. 


10:20 


a. 


m. 


7:00 


a. 


m. 


11:20 


a. 


m. 


7:50 


a. 


m. 


12:20 


p. 


m. 


8:25 


a. 


m. 


1:00 


p. 


m. 


9:00 


a. 


m. 


1:40 


p. 


m. 


9:40 


a. 


m. 


2:20 


p. 


m. 


10:30 


a. 


m. 


3:00 


p. 


m. 


11:00 


a. 


m. 


3:40 


p. 


m. 


12:00 




in. 


4:15 


p. 


m. 


1:00 


p. 


m. 


4:30 


p. 


m. 


1:50 


p. 


m. 


4:45 


p. 


m. 


2:30 


p. 


m. 


5:30 


p. 


m. 


8:00 


p. 


m. 


6:30 


p. 


m. 


3:40 


p. 


m. 


7:30 


p. 


m. 


4:25 


p. 


m. 


8:30 


p. 


m. 


5:00 


p. 


m. 


9:30 


p. 


m. 


5:40 


p. 


m. 


10:30 


p. 


m. 


6:15 


p. 


m. 








7:00 


p. 


m. 
PHO» 


fES: 







Mary^'ille, Both Phones 411 
Knoxville. Old 9110; New 2962 

WB MAKE SPECIAL TRIPS 



Kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiii: i 

75 ^ 



Established 1859 

"*C/je ^liCitchells have been printing 

over fify years. ' ' 




T^-L he plant complete. Bookmaking in its 
L^ entirety under one roof and one super- 
^''^ll vision. Complete service. Editorial, 

Composition, Presswork, Plates and Binding. 

Output limited to tKe manufacture of books, 

colors, and business literature. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR 
UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annuals, Handbooks, Catalogues, Diploma 
Cases, Brochures, Text Books, Laboratory 
Manuals, Engraving, Steel Die stamping, etc. 

Makers of Mitchell-Made SUPERFINISH 
book covers, the beautifully) grained, highly? 
Embossed and artistically colored line. 

«|*a— lu^— ■■— u^— ■■.^■a^— B>^— ■■^~ai— ii^— ■«!* 

WM. Mitchell printing Co. 

Edition T^rintcTS and finders 
GREENFIELD. INDIANA 



llllllltllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilMIIIIIIJIIIlUIIIIII 

ADDRESSES 



limilllllllllllllllllllllllHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIililUIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllHIIIIIIIIi 

IT 



UUiHIIUIIIIIIillUllllllllliUlllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllilltlllllMIIIII 

ADDRKSSBS 



78 



iiHiiriiMiiiiitMiiiiliiniiinMMiiiiiitiliitMiiiifriiiiMiiiiiitiiMtiitiMiiiiKiiiiitrn 
ADDRESSBS 



iiinntiiiffiiimfnittiimiiminiiiiiHiiminiiiiinMnimnii 

79 



iiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiMimHiiiHiiiiiitiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiinm 
ADDRESS SBS 



80 



IIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIItllllllMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllltllllllllllltllllllllllllllllll 



addrgsse:s 

iiiiriiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit 



8t 



ADDRBSSi:S 



82 ■ 



lllllilMIIIIIHIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllll! 

ADDRGSSGS 



8S 



addrbsse:s 



8« 



ADDRKSSGS 



8S 



me:morandum 



86 



iiiiiiinn(MiiiiiiiniriiiimiiMiiiiiiii!iiiMiiiiiiifiiniiinmmiiiimiinimiiHiit 
MBMdRANDtJM 



niHiniiiiiiitimiiimiinnniiHiiiiiniUHniHniiiiimiiiiininiiiHHnHiitinmr 

8?^ 



IIIIM!IUIIIIIIIIIItllllllllIIII|HIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!tl!tllll!llllllllllllllllllllll 

MEMORANDUM 



88 



MEMORANDUM 



89: 



•lllllllllilllllllllllUIHIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllilllllllllllllHIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllll 

MEMORANDUM 



»0^ 



iMiiniiiiMiiiiiriiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiMtitMiiMiiMiiiiiiMn 
MEMORANDUM 



iitiiiMiirtniiiiiiiinniimiiiiiiiiiiiitMiiiiHitiiiiMiimMiMiiiMiMiiiMiiiiiiiMiiii 
91 



ORANDUM 



92 



lllllllltlllMIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIHIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllll 

MEMORANDUM 



tlHIIIIIIIHIIinillllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllllllll 

93 



MEMORANDtJM 



94 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiii 



MEyWORANDUM 



MIMHHHUIHIIII|ll)IUHiUIIIHilllltUIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJilMI<IIMilll<llllilHIIMilll 
94 



HIIIUIIMIUIIIIIIIUIIIIHIIIIIIlMlllliiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiHiiiiiiiiiiHU 

MKIIORANQUM